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Should I Test My Home Air for Meth?

November 10, 2016

As the manufacture and sale of methamphetamine (meth) is on the rise, more and more homeowners are concerned about exposure to the hazardous chemicals found in this dangerous drug. If you have just recently moved into a new home, you may want to have the home air tested to alert you to the presence of chemicals commonly found in the manufacturing of meth. Protect your family’s health, and have your home air tested for peace of mind.

What is meth?
Meth is a very commonly used recreational drug. It’s most often found in white powder-like or crystal form. It affects the body by stimulating the central nervous system. The manufacturing of meth has gained momentum as access to the ingredients needed to produce this drug have become more readily accessible. Many of the common ingredients are found in everyday household products. The ingredients used in the manufacture of meth vary from recipe to recipe and include: gasoline, bleach, and pseudoephedrine (commonly found in over the counter cold/sinus medications).

How is meth a threat for non-drug users?
Those involved in the manufacturing of meth usually are not careful with how they dispose of these hazardous chemicals and “dump” sites are often found in recreational areas, wooded locations, in homes and along the roadside. Due to the rising concerns of methamphetamine and the production of it, many home buyers are worried about the possibility that the homes they are considering purchasing may have been used as a meth lab. The lingering chemical residue from meth manufacturing poses a serious health threat.

What are symptoms of exposure to meth production residue?
The most common symptoms of residual methamphetamine exposure mimic allergy symptoms and include: headaches, eye irritation, skin irritation, chest pain, fatigue and a constant feeling of coldness or weakness.

What can I do if I suspect my home may have been used in the production of meth?
If you are worried about your new home having possibly been used in the production of meth, there are a few different options for testing. A general air quality test such as Home Air Check VOC/Mold test will allow you to look at the overall indoor air quality and give you peace of mind that the chemical levels in the home are within average home readings. This testing method for air quality does not test specifically for meth but will alert you to elevated levels of potentially harmful ingredients. Wipe testing kits are available on the market and look for the residual meth that may have settled out of the air onto the countertops, door jams, light fixtures, and ceiling fan blades.